Meet Kathleen Wheeler, author of Brought to Our Senses

brought-to-our-senses-book-cover-webBy Kathleen H. Wheeler

Why choose Alzheimer’s as the focus of my new family saga novel Brought To Our Senses?

It’s a fair question. After all, Alzheimer’s is argued to be the disease feared most of all. The mind-robbing illness has a bad reputation and a stigma-stifling discussion in mixed company. So why exactly would I tackle such a difficult subject, one so many avoid altogether or shrug off as hopeless?

The answer is simple: it’s personal. Continue reading

Meet Krysten Lindsay Hager – How Young Adult Fiction Helps Heal and Educate

By Krysten Lindsay Hager

competingwiththestarAfter my dad passed in the summer of 2015, I was sitting on my couch watching TV when I got a message from some readers asking what happened next for my characters Nick and Hadley from my book, Next Door to a Star. I was in my grief bubble, and this email was a welcome bright spot letting me know someone cared enough about the characters to want to know their future. I thought writing about what happened next might be a way to get my mind off grieving. It was when I got to sixty pages that I realized I might have a book. Continue reading

Meet Cathie Borrie, author of The Long Hello-Memory, My Mother, and Me

usa-cover-jpgBy Cathie Borrie

In an almost Zen-like poetic form, my mother revealed the changing landscape of her mind:

“Listen, Cathie . . . a bird!

“What are the birds saying?’

“They’re chirping.”

“In a language?”

“In their language. In an upside down language.” Continue reading

Meet Ann Campanella, author of Motherhood: Lost and Found

By Ann Campanella

anncampanellaIn my early 30s, I learned that life can change direction when you least expect it. My husband Joel and I had moved from Houston to North Carolina in order to be closer to my parents. We both had successful careers – he as a businessman and me as a writer and editor. We were looking forward to Continue reading

Meet Molly LeGrand, dementia advocate, caregiver and blogger

molly-legrand-bio-picBy Molly LeGrand

I’ve worked in Long Term Care as an Activities Assistant for ten years. This role has offered a unique perspective on Alzheimer’s as I typically will meet the person after a diagnosis. And just like I would with a new friend or colleague, I begin to get to know them, and I get to know Continue reading

Meet Wayne Evans, creator of “Let’s Sing From Memory”

letssingfrommemoryI’ve never had a family member diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, nor have I been a caregiver. I didn’t even know much about the disease until recently. But now I have a “new family” of over 20 people with Alzheimer’s, in addition to their loving caregivers. Continue reading

Meet Paula Spencer Scott, author of “Surviving Alzheimer’s: Practical Tips and Soul-Saving Wisdom for Caregivers”

 

survivingalzcover-2By Paula Spencer Scott

I knew little about dementia back when my grandmother began using a kitchen pot for a commode. Or when my dad began wailing, “Oh why didn’t anyone tell me?” on the day after my mother’s funeral, because he’d already forgotten she died. Continue reading

Meet Sharleen Scott, author of Tangles

tanglescomplete2ebookcoverBy Sharleen Scott

Her name was Judy, and I married her son.

She was a Depression-era child who grew up in the Pacific Northwest forests, traveling with her grandfather’s logging company. She was an outdoorswoman who loved fishing, hunting, and hosting friends and family at her Cascade mountain cabin. She married Paul at age seventeen but was Continue reading

Meet Claudia Rumwell and the Senior Care Organizer

By Claudia Rumwell

“Caregiving is not for wimps.”

Mom had been falling much too often. Then I heard from a visiting relative that in order to safely come up the stairs from the basement of their home, Mom and Dad had to sit on a stair and scoot up one at a time.

Answers needed.

Mom was diagnosed with Parkinson’s. Dad was fairly stable with his previous stroke. But it was time to make some changes.

“Ducks in a Row?” Did I have my “ducks in a row” when it came to starting the process of taking care of my parents’ needs? I did not. Did they? No. And you might think that a nurse would know exactly what to do, but that wasn’t the case. I learned as I went along.

And I learned a lot. I remember collecting pages of information which held answers to questions that I had asked. I learned about senior care professionals who can help find living locations, or guide you in care management. I found out that my parents didn’t have the needed documents e.g., health care directive; power of attorney. And I had to search for important papers that were well hidden in their home.

The ten years of “hands-on” experience as a parent caregiver was the main impetus and inspiration for creation of the Senior Care Organizer which is a “hands-on” guide for collecting and organizing the necessary information to manage senior adult care. My goal was to provide a resource for others who are or would be going through my experience. I thought…..Why should they have to “reinvent the wheel?”

My parents may not have had Alzheimer’s, although in her last year of life, Mom did acquire the Parkinson’s form of dementia; but they are good examples of the importance of getting things in order as soon as possible. Especially once things change or the diagnosis has been made.

The Senior Care Organizer will help you, as a caregiver, do that very thing. It provides an easy method and plan to get organized, identify resources, learn about what to do first, how to do it, and where to go to find specific help. It comes in a 3 ring Notebook format or in a downloadable interactive PDF format that can be saved and revised on your computer. You can see a Preview of some of the book’s contents on the website, or with the Look Inside feature on Amazon.

So whatever caregiving challenges may be ahead, don’t forget there are others who can help you and resources to support you.

“Hardships often prepare ordinary people for an extraordinary destiny.” C.S. Lewis

About the Author

Claudia Rumwell is a registered nurse, educator, author and patient advocate who has worked with seniors for over 40 years. In 2008, as a result of advocating for her parent’s changing health care needs for 10+ years; she shifted her nursing focus to the area of senior care. In addition to consulting, she enjoys providing workshops that focus on senior care topics. In addition to updating the Senior Care Organizer, currently in its 4th edition, she updates the Links/Resources and publishes monthly educational articles in the Helpful Articles section of the Website www.seniorcareorganizer.com; and posts articles and other links on Facebook.  You can also find her on Twitter.

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12 Reasons to Gift a Book from the AlzAuthors Bookstore

book-tree-memeBy Marianne Sciucco

Most likely, you know someone caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia. With 5.4 million Americans affected, this disease affects the lives of so many of our families, friends, neighbors, and coworkers. We may feel inclined to do something, to help, but may not know what to do, or how to do it, or when. Continue reading