Turn Around, Red Robin

Last week I was reminded that answers or solutions aren’t necessarily what or even where they initially appear…

UnknownI opened the pedestrian door from our garage onto our patio to sounds of frantic fluttering and flapping, coming from our next-door neighbor’s yard. My first thought was “Oh, no, an injured bird.” As I walked closer to the fence dividing our yards, that’s indeed what it appeared. I saw a robin hopping about and frantically flapping his wings. However, when I looked more closely, I realized that wasn’t it at all. The robin was “imprisoned” inside a loop of chicken wire mesh.

In an attempt to keep his dog away from a section of our shared fence, my neighbor had installed a few feet of chicken wire. The wire had detached from one end and was partially curled over, forming an empty cylinder. Somehow the robin had skittered into this unintentional birdcage, and was now trying his utmost to batter the chicken wire into releasing him to freedom. It was easy to see the effort was causing the bird a great deal of stress and would ultimately exhaust him.

If only we could only redirect the bird to reverse direction and look behind him toward our shared fence, he’d see there was a wide opening in the chicken wire where he could easily hop out and escape his self-made prison. My husband retrieved a broom from the garage Continue reading

In the Limelight with Jennifer Brush

9781452590738_COVER.inddThis week, I’d like to welcome guest blogger Jennifer Brush, M.A, CCC/SLP. She and Kerry Mills are the authors of I Care: A Handbook For Care Partners Of People With Dementia.

Jennifer, it’s great to have you back for your second appearance on my blog. First of all, I’d like you to know how much I enjoyed reading your handbook I Care. It’s a true little gem of a book. I certainly would have appreciated having such a wealth of practical information at my fingertips after my parents were both diagnosed with dementia back in 2004.

I’d like to start our interview with you sharing an overview of I Care, along with some of the topics covered in your handbook.

The goal of I Care is to help families have fulfilling, loving, and nurturing relationships and to minimize any depression and stress they might feel when caring for someone with dementia. Every chapter has many useful and practical suggestions to help families feel empowered, rather than defeated, while dealing with the daily trials of dementia.

I Care discusses how to prepare for the future while living in the present, how to make the most of your day, where to look for help when you need it, how to communicate effectively with someone with memory loss, and where to make changes in your home so it is safe. I Care clearly explains the essential information you need to be the best care partner you can be.

Can you explain what motivated you to the write this handbook?

I’ve been working with people living with dementia and their care partners for 25 years. Although there’s a lot of information now available on the Internet for people to read about dementia, family members still have a real need for practical advice to help them Continue reading